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    Want to improve the odds of strategy execution? Ask any executive that question and they're certain to nod in enthusiastic agreement. Well, I have one piece of can't miss advice that will ensure you beat the oft-cited statistics of execution failure. Here it is: Have a well-understood strategy and communicate it widely.

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    An enterprise-level Balanced Scorecard is owned by the senior team (which is responsible for strategy). To create a high level Scorecard and formulate a robust plan for strategy implementation, the initiative needs to take into consideration the people-related elements that need to be addressed at the very outset. This article, structured in a Q & A format, answers the question ‘What is the role of the HR function in creating an enterprise-level Balanced Scorecard?’

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    In this article, the author examines the need for finding common ground between strategy management and operations management. While strategy management seeks to make strategy relevant to employee’s day-to-day responsibilities, operations management seeks strategic context for implementation and improvement projects. The author presents a performance management framework that describes the common ground.

    The author points out that the lack of connect between strategic performance and operational performance leads to issues such as lack of alignment, misallocation of resources, short-term focus, and a failure to perceive risk, among other things. 

    Moving on, the author demonstrates how methodologies such as the Balanced Scorecard and Lean Six Sigma can potentially create the common ground between strategic and operational performance management. What organizations need is a framework that makes this intersection possible.

    The author presents one possible solution, which is in consonance with the needs of strategy management and operation management practices such as the four-stage Deming improvement cycle of Plan-Do-Check-Act. The author goes on to provide a detailed elaboration of how, at every stage, it is possible to create strategic and operational components, with related perspectives, tools, and techniques. By viewing the management of performance as a system with strategic and operational components, the author concludes, this framework is offers a unifying foundation for an organization’s performance management needs.

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    Management writer and educator James Creelman is, in the words of David Norton, co-creator of the Balanced Scorecard, ‘the foremost chronicler and historian of the Balanced Scorecard movement.’ Author/co-author of 16 important management reports and books, James Creelman answers a question about how to get the right balance of strategic objectives in a Strategy Map, so that it does not become unmanageably complex or far too simple with no meaning.

    Creelman responds that the greatest value of strategy mapping is that it provides the opportunity to identify the critical few strategic capabilities and relationships that will really make the difference in delivering the strategy. He observes that this is a great challenge in practice. So, organizations opt for generic objectives or ignore strategically critical objectives. The result is a poor Strategy Map.

    At the same time, trying to capture all the causality makes the Strategy Map too complex, confusing and inappropriate as a day-to-day strategy management tool.
    Drawing on examples such as Saatchi & Saatchi Worldwide, Creelman then presents the outlines of a solution that bring together 1) the beauty of simplicity so that the Strategy Map offers a laser focus, is easy to communicate and inspires, and 2) still captures the primary drivers of strategy. He also points out that organizations should focus on stressing the relationships between groups of strategic objectives or between strategic perspectives so that the real dynamics of value creation in the marketplace are captured adequately.

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    Management writer and educator James Creelman is, in the words of David Norton, co-creator of the Balanced Scorecard, ‘the foremost chronicler and historian of the Balanced Scorecard movement.’ Author/co-author of 16 important management reports and books, James Creelman here answers a question seeking his view of the new Office of Strategy Management (OSM). In response, James Creelman traces the origin of the Office of Strategy Management concept, believes that it has actually taken a rather long time to emerge and how it is now creating a space for strategic management as a core organizational function, much in the same manner as HR or finance. He then goes on to describe the seven responsibilities of the Office of Strategy Management.
     
    Further, he believes that, in practice, the concept can make a difference to the success of performance management and Balanced Scorecard initiatives by focusing on the inculcation of Balanced Scorecard and strategy management skills. Creelman anticipates that the OSM concept will address several problems – such as the present Project Manager view of the Balanced Scorecard Manager – and finally ensure that strategy is managed as a single end-to-end process, from formulation to execution to feedback. Creelman also predicts that the OSM concept will be the most enduring legacy of Norton and Kaplan because, he feels, inculcating strategy management as a core function has greater implications for organizational management in the 21st century than even the Balanced Scorecard

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    This interview features Lawrence Ganti, Corporate Director, Office of Strategy Management, for the Geneva, Switzerland based Serono, which reported 2005 revenues of more than $2.5 billion, making it the largest biotechnology company in Europe and among the leaders in the world. It has eight manufacturing plants and 4,900 employees spread across 45 countries. Serono’s groundbreaking work includes its treatments for infertility, growth hormone deficiency and multiple sclerosis. Serono was inducted into the prestigious Balanced Scorecard Collaborative Hall of Fame in 2006.


    In this interview, drawing from his experience of facilitating the Balanced Scorecard program in Serono, Lawrence Ganti presents a practitioner’s viewpoint regarding various aspects of the Balanced Scorecard concept.

    In the course of a wide-ranging interview, Lawrence Ganti discusses how long he has been managing the Balanced Scorecard in Serono, the scope of his role as Director of the Office of Strategy Management, how the Balanced Scorecard is managed within Serono, the reasons why his job of Balanced Scorecard Manager is a full-time position, how he first got involved with the Balanced Scorecard, his involvement with the Balanced Scorecard initiative in Serono, the key personal and professional qualities necessary for a Balanced Scorecard manager, the training he received, the use of his functional background in managing the Balanced Scorecard program, the nature of senior management backing he received, the major challenges he faced when building and implementing the Balanced Scorecard, how to overcome the challenges and maintain the momentum of the scorecard initiative, and the system Serono has in place for managing the Balanced Scorecard. Further, Lawrence Ganti also tells us what he enjoys most about working with the Balanced Scorecard, how it benefits him personally and tries to see how his role would evolve 2-3 years down the line. Finally, drawing from his experience, he identifies critical success factors in succeeding as a Balanced Scorecard manager.

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    This interview features Julian Taylor, director of strategy development and network performance for Scottish Enterprise Network (SE), which is Scotland’s main economic development agency and comprises Scottish Enterprise National (the coordinating body) and 12 Local Enterprise Companies (LECs) that collectively cover 93 per cent of the nation’s population. In this interview, drawing from his experience of facilitating the Balanced Scorecard program in Scottish Enterprise, Julian Taylor presents a practitioner’s viewpoint regarding various aspects of the Balanced Scorecard concept.

    In the course of a wide-ranging interview, Julian Taylor discusses how long he has been managing the Balanced Scorecard in Scottish Enterprise, how the Balanced Scorecard is managed within Scottish Enterprise, the reasons why his job of Balanced Scorecard Manager is a full-time position, how he first got involved with the Balanced Scorecard, his involvement with the Balanced Scorecard initiative in Scottish Enterprise, the key personal and professional qualities necessary for a Balanced Scorecard manager, the training he received, the use of his functional background in managing the Balanced Scorecard program, the nature of senior management backing he received, the major challenges he faced when building and implementing the Balanced Scorecard, how to overcome the challenges and maintain the momentum of the scorecard initiative, and the system Scottish Enterprise has in place for managing the Balanced Scorecard. Further, Julian Taylor also tells us what he enjoys most about working with the Balanced Scorecard, how it benefits him personally and tries to see how his role would evolve 2-3 years down the line. Finally, drawing from his experience, he identifies critical success factors in succeeding as a Balanced Scorecard manager.

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    This is an interview done with John Monczewski, when he was Manager, Balanced Scorecard for The GO-Team of the global management consultancy Booz Allen Hamilton. With then about 900 employees and headquartered in McLean, Virginia, USA, The GO-Team is an amalgam of the support functions of a conventional corporate structure. In this interview, drawing from his experience of facilitating the Balanced Scorecard program in Booz Allen Hamilton, John Monczewski presents a practitioner’s viewpoint regarding various aspects of the Balanced Scorecard concept.

    In the course of a wide-ranging interview, John Monczewski discusses how long he has been managing the Balanced Scorecard in Booz Allen Hamilton, how the Balanced Scorecard is managed within Booz Allen Hamilton, the reasons why his job of Balanced Scorecard Manager is a full-time position, how he first got involved with the Balanced Scorecard, his involvement with the Balanced Scorecard initiative in Booz Allen Hamilton, the key personal and professional qualities necessary for a Balanced Scorecard manager, the training he received, the use of his functional background in managing the Balanced Scorecard program, the nature of senior management backing he received, the major challenges he faced when building and implementing the Balanced Scorecard, how to overcome the challenges and maintain the momentum of the scorecard initiative, and the system Booz Allen Hamilton has in place for managing the Balanced Scorecard. Further, John Monczewski also tells us what he enjoys most about working with the Balanced Scorecard, how it benefits him personally and tries to see how his role would evolve 2-3 years down the line. Finally, drawing from his experience, he identifies critical success factors in succeeding as a Balanced Scorecard manager.

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    This interview features Felix Kwok Wah Ng, Standards and Performance manager of the Hong Kong based MTR Corporation, which operates a railway network of 91 kilometers with 53 stations. With a daily patronage of over 2.4 million passengers, the MTR railway system is one of the most intensively utilized in the world. In this interview, drawing from his experience of facilitating the Balanced Scorecard program in MTR, Felix Kwok presents a practitioner’s viewpoint regarding various aspects of the Balanced Scorecard concept.

    In the course of a wide-ranging interview, Felix Kwok discusses how long he has been managing the Balanced Scorecard in MTR, how the Balanced Scorecard is managed within MTR, the amount of time he commits in his role, his involvement with the Balanced Scorecard initiative in MTR, the key personal and professional qualities demanded by his role in scorecard facilitation, the training he received, the use of his functional background in managing the Balanced Scorecard program, the nature of senior management backing he received, the major challenges he faced when building and implementing the Balanced Scorecard, how to overcome the challenges, and the system MTR  has in place for managing the Balanced Scorecard. Further, Felix Kwok also tells us what he enjoys most about working with the Balanced Scorecard, how it benefits him personally and tries to see how his role would evolve 2-3 years down the line. Finally, drawing from his experience, he identifies critical success factors in succeeding as a Balanced Scorecard manager.

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    This interview features Bjarte Bogsnes, Project Manager Beyond Budgeting for Stavanger, Norway-based Statoil, an integrated oil and gas company with about 25,000 employees and activities in 32 countries. In this interview, drawing from his experience of facilitating the Balanced Scorecard program in Statoil, Bjarte Bogsnes presents a practitioner’s viewpoint regarding various aspects of the Balanced Scorecard concept.

    In the course of a wide-ranging interview, Bjarte Bogsnes discusses how the Balanced Scorecard is managed within Statoil, how the Balanced Scorecard fits into the Beyond Budgeting initiative he is leading, what makes the Balanced Scorecard more useful as a management tool than the budget, the amount of time he commits in his role, his involvement with the Balanced Scorecard initiative in Statoil, the key personal and professional qualities demanded by his role in scorecard facilitation, the training he received, the use of his functional background in managing the Balanced Scorecard program, the nature of senior management backing he received, the major challenges he faced when building and implementing the Balanced Scorecard, how to overcome the challenges, and the system Statoil has in place for managing the Balanced Scorecard. Further, Bjarte Bogsnes also tells us what he enjoys most about working with the Balanced Scorecard, how it benefits him personally and tries to see how his role would evolve 2-3 years down the line. Finally, drawing from his experience, he identifies critical success factors in succeeding as a Balanced Scorecard manager.

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